Show Navigation

What we do

PCAT’s grants have focused on four main programme areas. These programme areas have been indentified by PCAT’s local partners as being able to make the most impact in the areas in which PCAT’s partner agencies work

1 Projects which enable people to both increase and diversify their income

The Peter Cowley Africa Trust’s grants are focused on two areas of Kenya, Machakos and Mbeere. Most households earn their living from small scale subsistence agriculture. Farms are typically two to four acres. The main crops grown are maize, beans, green grams, cowpeas and pigeon peas. In Mbeere many families also keep goats.

Kamwimbi women's self-help group, with some of the goats purchased through a Trust grant. The goats are an improved breed with a much higher production of milk than with traditional goat breeds.

Climate change has seriously affected people’s livelihoods. Both areas have suffered from prolonged droughts over recent years. Few farmers are able to practise irrigation, access to credit is poor, and farmers lack the necessary organisation to negotiate effectively with traders when selling surplus crops. 65% of the population of Mbeere live on less than £1 per day. More…

2 Projects which provide safe drinking water and improve water security

Eastern Kenya, where The Peter Cowley Africa Trust’s two partner agencies are located, is a semi-arid area. Many families rely on seasonal rivers which may dry up when there is no rain. Others collect water from water sources which may also be used by cattle and goats and the water is not safe to drink. Few homes have access to piped water. Many have no nearby borehole. For most families hours are spent collecting water. The collection and storage of rainwater is an important source of water for domestic purposes. Having a sufficiently large water storage tank can provide a water supply for a family between the rainy seasons. Gutters and storage tanks for schools can reduce the need for students to collect water. More…

A village borehole provides a safe water resource and releases people from the everyday task of collecting water from unreliable sources.

3 Projects which support education

Although both primary and secondary education is free families still have to meet the cost of providing basic school facilities and school equipment. Many schools in rural areas have no electricity or access to piped water. Collecting water is a regular part of the school day for many students.

Improving school buildings enables a more consistent education.

Many poor families in rural areas are unable to afford school fees. This is a particular problem during periods of drought when family incomes drop. Inability to meet basic school fees can mean students may miss school. The result is that education for many students may be interrupted with a consequent impact on educational attainment in the all important exams at the end of their four years of secondary school education. More…

4 Projects which improve the health of local communities

Many health indicators show the need for improvements in healthcare in Kenya, particularly in rural areas. The infant mortality rate is 52 per 1000 live births (in the UK the rate is 5). The most common causes of death are acute respiratory infections, diarrhoea, measles, malaria and HIV/AIDS. Malnutrition is an element in 54% of all child deaths.

A well equipped local dispensary is essential in improving the health of rural communities where a hospital is not within easy reach.

The maternal mortality rate per 100,000 births is 410 whilst in the UK it is 12. In Mwala District, one of the two main areas in which PCAT funds projects, only 1.9% of births are attended by a qualified health professional and only 20% of women attend four or more antenatal appointments. 68% of homes in Kenya do not have access to a latrine. Most have no access to piped water. The average distance from a health facility is 15km. More…

1 Projects which enable people to both increase and diversify their income

The Peter Cowley Africa Trust’s grants are focussed on two areas of Kenya, Machakos and Mbeere. Most households earn their living from small scale subsistence agriculture. Farms are typically two to four acres. The main crops grown are maize, beans, green grams, cowpeas and pigeon peas. In Mbeere many families also keep goats.

Kamwimbi women's self-help group, with some of the goats purchased through a Trust grant. The goats are an improved breed with a much higher production of milk than with traditional goat breeds.

Climate change has seriously affected people’s livelihoods. Both areas have suffered from prolonged droughts over recent years. Few farmers are able to practise irrigation, access to credit is poor, and farmers lack the necessary organisation to negotiate effectively with traders when selling surplus crops. 65% of the population of Mbeere live on less than £1 per day. More…

2 Projects which provide safe drinking water and improve water security

Eastern Kenya, where The Peter Cowley Africa Trust’s two partner agencies are located, is a semi-arid area. Many families rely on seasonal rivers which may dry up when there is no rain. Others collect water from water sources which may also be used by cattle and goats and the water is not safe to drink. Few homes have access to piped water. Many have no nearby borehole. For most families hours are spent collecting water. The collection and storage of rainwater is an important source of water for domestic purposes. Having a sufficiently large water storage tank can provide a water supply for a family between the rainy seasons. Gutters and storage tanks for schools can reduce the need for students to collect water. More…

A village borehole provides a safe water resource and releases people from the everyday task of collecting water from unreliable sources.

3 Projects which support education

Although both primary and secondary education is free families still have to meet the cost of providing basic school facilities and school equipment. Many schools in rural areas have no electricity or access to piped water. Collecting water is a regular part of the school day for many students.

Improving school buildings enables a more consistent education.

Many poor families in rural areas are unable to afford school fees. This is a particular problem during periods of drought when family incomes drop. Inability to meet basic school fees can mean students may miss school. The result is that education for many students may be interrupted with a consequent impact on educational attainment in the all important exams at the end of their four years of secondary school education. More…

4 Projects which improve the health of local communities

Many health indicators show the need for improvements in healthcare in Kenya, particularly in rural areas. The infant mortality rate is 52 per 1000 live births (in the UK the rate is 5). The most common causes of death are acute respiratory infections, diarrhoea, measles, malaria and HIV/AIDS. Malnutrition is an element in 54% of all child deaths.

A well equipped local dispensary is essential in improving the health of rural communities where a hospital is not within easy reach.

The maternal mortality rate per 100,000 births is 410 whilst in the UK it is 12. In Mwala District, one of the two main areas in which PCAT funds projects, only 1.9% of births are attended by a qualified health professional and only 20% of women attend four or more antenatal appointments. 68% of homes in Kenya do not have access to a latrine. Most have no access to piped water. The average distance from a health facility is 15km. More…

TOP
TOP